No eReader for Blackberry?!?

As you might know from a recent post, I bought a blackberry a short while ago. Aside from a few minor issues getting it working with the exchange server at work, it has been a great device.

Except one company doesn’t agree. Motricity, the people who run eReader, says that they have no plans to support Blackberry with a version of eReader. That means that the books I have bought from them over the years won’t work on my Blackberry. That really sucks, but I suspect it will suck more for motricity than for Blackberry. I know I’m not going back to a palm that can’t deal with networking or a windows mobile machine that takes forever to do anything and crashes all the time, giving up reliable email in the process, just to be able to read their books. Let alone buy more of them.

Here’s to hoping they change their mind. In the mean time, I guess it’s back to paper.

Living with the Palm TX

It’s been over a week since I got the TX, so I’ve had plenty of time to give a good workout. It’s been a rough road, but I’m really warming up to this new model.

The built in wi-fi is awesome – really nice to have. The unit itself is fairly nice, if very much cheapened since the T3 days. The new software for hotsyncing is better than the old, or should I say it has more features. It’s the first version of Hotsync that has had problems with syncing to Outlook reliably.

The unit started out with about the same reliability as Windows ME (which, as I recall, stood for “Mostly Excrement”). It reset about every other time I tried to access a network of any kind. Most of the time when a program tried to fire up a connection I got an error saying the attempt failed, but if I went into the wi-fi tool or prefs directly I had no trouble connecting.

The hotsync process had been very unreliable as well. It would sync just fine, as long as I didn’t change any data anywhere, or try to sync with another computer.

When I got the TX, I had read enough to know not to just do a recovery sync to get everything out of my old T3 into the TX. I carefully uninstalled everything, even the PC software, and started fresh. I did save my old backup directory, and did transer a few items from there to the new Palm, but only a few – Teal Auto, and Splash ID.

That’s why I was so frustrated with the unit, and I thought for sure Palm was just foisting more junk on us. Then I decided to try again.

This time I just stuck with what came with the Palm, and didn’t sync with any computer but my work PC. So far, it’s been very reliable. I have added a few more apps,and the only penalty I’ve paid is a bug with the bluetooth setup for adding a phone (maybe more on that later).

Another thing I did, which I think is significant, is I reformatted the memory card I had been using. I copied all the stuff on it to my PC then stuck it back in the TX and reformatted it. I can’t offer any particular evidence, but I think this helped with the reliability.

Now I’ve got a totally different impression of the system. The ability to have the memory card in while on the net is very key for keeping your email with you – my entire 100+mb IMAP account is tucked away in Snappermail, and even finds work fairly fast.

I’m sitting in London as I write this – I’m there for an IFRA conference – and the TX is the only computer I’ve brought with me. So far it’s been enough, and it’s so much easier to carry. The syncing really needs to be improved, as it takes a long time, but I suppose there is some security in knowing everything’s backed up. The bad news is that they’ve removed the “Primary PC” settings choice from the hotsync menu so you cannot setup a freshly-hard-reset palm to recovery sync from the net. That’s a shame – one should be able to do that. One of the things that makes the Palm so attractive as a laptop replacement is the relative ease of disaster recovery. At least, in theory.

Palm TX – keyboard driver causes Bluetooth problem

Are you a Palm TX owner whoâ??s getting frustrated getting the Palm TX to connect or talk to Bluetooth devices? If yes, I might have an answer for ya.

I got a TX a while ago, and I really like the unit. However, itâ??s bit less stable than my old T3. Part of the problem is that some older software evidently isnâ??t compatible with the new unit. The main symptom is spontaneous resets, but another I discovered was an inability to set up a new phone to connect via Bluetooth. I noticed that when I click the â??Bâ?? icon in the status bar the window that came up showed a flickering â??Connectâ?? button down under Network Service. By doing a hard reset, and then trying to set up a new device and noticing both that the setup was trouble free and there was no flickering Connect button, I determined that some piece of software was causing the problem.

Of course, going through everything by trial and error is no fun, but there was little choice. I guessed, was wrong, and guessed again, deleting apps one by one.

Then it occurred to me that the keyboard driver might be the culprit. I went in, turned it off, and voila! The Connect button just barely flickers, and I was able to setup a Bluetooth device no problem.

Living with the Palm TX

It’s been over a week since I got the TX, so I’ve had plenty of time to give a good workout. It’s been a rough road, but I’m really warming up to this new model.

The built in wi-fi is awesome – really nice to have. The unit itself is fairly nice, if very much cheapened since the T3 days. The new software for hotsyncing is better than the old, or should I say it has more features. It’s the first version of Hotsync that has had problems with syncing to Outlook reliably.

The unit started out with about the same reliability as Windows ME (which, as I recall, stood for “Mostly Excrement”). It reset about every other time I tried to access a network of any kind. Most of the time when a program tried to fire up a connection I got an error saying the attempt failed, but if I went into the wi-fi tool or prefs directly I had no trouble connecting.

The hotsync process had been very unreliable as well. It would sync just fine, as long as I didn’t change any data anywhere, or try to sync with another computer.

When I got the TX, I had read enough to know not to just do a recovery sync to get everything out of my old T3 into the TX. I carefully uninstalled everything, even the PC software, and started fresh. I did save my old backup directory, and did transer a few items from there to the new Palm, but only a few – Teal Auto, and Splash ID.

That’s why I was so frustrated with the unit, and I thought for sure Palm was just foisting more junk on us. Then I decided to try again.

This time I just stuck with what came with the Palm, and didn’t sync with any computer but my work PC. So far, it’s been very reliable. I have added a few more apps,and the only penalty I’ve paid is a bug with the bluetooth setup for adding a phone (maybe more on that later).

Another thing I did, which I think is significant, is I reformatted the memory card I had been using. I copied all the stuff on it to my PC then stuck it back in the TX and reformatted it. I can’t offer any particular evidence, but I think this helped with the reliability.

Now I’ve got a totally different impression of the system. The ability to have the memory card in while on the net is very key for keeping your email with you – my entire 100+mb IMAP account is tucked away in Snappermail, and even finds work fairly fast.

I’m sitting in London as I write this – I’m there for an IFRA conference – and the TX is the only computer I’ve brought with me. So far it’s been enough, and it’s so much easier to carry. The syncing really needs to be improved, as it takes a long time, but I suppose there is some security in knowing everything’s backed up. The bad news is that they’ve removed the “Primary PC” settings choice from the hotsync menu so you cannot setup a freshly-hard-reset palm to recovery sync from the net. That’s a shame – one should be able to do that. One of the things that makes the Palm so attractive as a laptop replacement is the relative ease of disaster recovery. At least, in theory.