Finally got low carb and running to work together

For the first time ever, I’ve figured out how to be on a low carb diet and run at the same time. I’ve tried this in the past, and as soon as I did any exercise that took my heart rate very high I immediately felt sluggish and out of breath.

I just assumed that fat took too much oxygen to metabolize and my poor inefficient lungs couldn’t’ keep up. But it turns out that I just wasn’t eating enough. Eating enough on a low carb diet is hard – very quickly the awesomely rich and forbidden foods become tiring.

The key was to add some heavy cream to my coffee, adding some fat calories first thing in the morning. Turns out I wasn’t eating enough. I’ve always been a black-coffee guy, but I gave this a try to get rid of ketone flu, and it worked.

So, with that problem solved I have lost some weight while getting mileage in.

Now my pace isn’t getting much faster, but for now the weight loss is what I’m after.

Avoid These LinkedIn Skills Management Mistakes

As I’ve been updating my Linkedin profile, I’ve been thinking about how to best use the skills section. In the new skills people can endorse you for having skills. Here’s some mistakes I’d made, and my thoughts on how best to manage the skills area going forward.

  1. Listing every skill I had, instead of those that really define the value I bring.At first I listed every skill I had – why not? It’s all about SEO and search terms, right? The problem is that the result looked like a dog’s breakfast. It was distracting and didn’t paint a clear picture of the value I offer. I cut out the skills that weren’t core to who I am, and left those that were most relevant.
  2. Listing the skills based on experience instead of value.I’ve always had great computer skills, and listing those was easy and comfortable. They don’t, however, represent the higher value I can bring. So I’ve removed them and added the higher value skills I offer – like analysis, management, etc.
  3. Leaving in the skills others entered for me.One of the annoying features of Linkedin’s skills area is that a visitor can endorse you for a new skill that you haven’t decided to list. This can result in erroneous and off-brand skills being listed. While having someone else give an endorsement is always nice, the result when many do it can bring back the disorganization and dilute the message. Of course, if everyone is endorsing me for a skill I haven’t listed, I should reconsider.

LinkedIn continues to change and evolve, and each time it changes how the site is used and what techniques make it most effective.

LinkedIn Profile Review by Jason Alba: Best Money Spent in a Long Time

I took Jason up on his recent offer of a webinar on the new LinkedIn profiles, along with a profile critique, and it’s been the best money I’ve spent in a long time.

A lot of really smart people have written many times that one should not hesitate to get help when it’s necessary, and to pay for expert knowledge when it make sense. By nature, however, I am a loner, do-it-myself guy. This year I decided that I should change that, and hiring Jason was the first step.

I’ve used Linked in since late 2004. I was a member of the MyLinkedinPowerForum back when it existed under that name, and was one of the early members of LinkedinMilwaukee, back when it was called that. I was one of the firs to speak and be published on the subject of using LinkedIn for competitive intelligence. So I know a few things about LinkedIn. Unfortunately things change quickly, and in my current position my skills started to lag.

It was hard to pull the trigger and spend the money, but I learned things I never would have found on my own (partly due to my own blind spots) and also got a dose of motivation. It’s funny, because when I go to a seminar on the job I expect that in exchange for $500 to $3,000 I will spend most of my time bored except for the few really choice nuggets, and they’re worth it. If they’re worth it on the job, why not in my professional life?

Looking for a piano teacher in the Milwaukee area?

Last June my oldest daughter finally brought her requests for piano lessons to a crescendo, and I relented and started looking for a teacher. Finding the right combination of price, location, and availability was a bit tricky. I didn’t really want to driver her out to one of the larger music stores for lessons (that could get very expensive me, with my shopping tendencies) so I focused on finding someone working out of their home.

I found Phyllis Stopp, a substitute teacher, nurse, and piano teacher. Old enough to be wise, young enough to deal with young children (my daughter is 7) and disciplined in her approach. We’ve been going since June, and we’ve been very happy with her.

Her rates are very reasonable (less than half of some places) and she’s located in Oak Creek. You can reach her at 414-764-2166 (h) or 414-721-6032 (c).